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CFATS–Hitting Its Stride

Posted: 07/20/15 at 8:00 AM

By David Wulf, Director of the Infrastructure Security Compliance Division, the office within the Office of Infrastructure Protection at the Department of Homeland Security  (DHS) that houses the Chemical Facility Anti-Terrorism Standards (CFATS) program

I would like to start by thanking SOCMA for the opportunity to reach its membership of specialty chemical manufacturers, a segment of the population regulated by the Chemical Facility Anti-Terrorism Standards program that—along with SOCMA—has been very supportive of promoting chemical security across the Nation.  

Once again, the Department of Homeland Security is co-sponsoring the annual Chemical Sector Security Summit with the Chemical Sector Coordinating Council on July 21–23, 2015—an effort in which SOCMA has played an in...

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California – 800-Pound Gorilla of TSCA Reform – Overwhelmingly Supports TSCA Modernization Act

Posted: 06/29/15 at 8:54 AM

By Dan Newton, Senior Manager, Government Relations

Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA) reform may soon become a reality if the House of Representatives’ easy passage of the TSCA Modernization Act of 2015 (H.R. 2576) is any indication. The House bill was passed in an incredible 398-1 vote on June 23, an impressive achievement given the contentious subject and in a highly partisan House of Representatives.

What is curiously noteworthy is how California’s representatives voted on H.R. 2576. Of all the states, California is the 800-pound gorilla when it comes to TSCA reform. Given the concerns California Democrats have raised on what have seemed to be irreconcilable issues like preemption, not to mention the fact it is heavily involved in chemicals management (e.g., safer consumer products regulations
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The $750 Million House Rule and Why Congress Needs to Get Rid of It

Posted: 06/22/15 at 8:15 AM

Bill Allmond, Vice President of Government & Public Relations

Bill Allmond, Vice President, Government and Public RelationsIt’s been 900 days since Congress imposed one of the largest tax hikes on America’s job creators in recently memory. On January 1, 2013, American manufacturers rang in the New Year facing a whopping $750 million tax on imported raw materials for which there is no domestic producer.

The tax hike was the result of an expired provision, known as the Miscellaneous Tariff Bill or MTB, that temporarily suspends a duty on an imported raw material that is not available in the U.S. Companies request these duty suspensions because they help lower the cost of their U.S. production, which can be significant if they must import these critical inputs from overseas. When approved by Congress, a duty suspension greatly reduces manufacturing costs not just for the company requesting it but for any manufacturer that imports those same raw materials on whic...

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